Looking for Striping in Washington, Missouri?

PROFESSIONAL ASPHALT PAVING

We have been paving St. Louis and the surrounding areas for 30 years. We are a family ran and operated business. We cover all asphalt needs. Give us a call today!

Schedule Your FREE Consultation

Quote Home Form

About Striping

Although asphalt striping might not look all that important, it needs to be of high consideration for several reasons. First of all, if you’re looking to improve your parking lot’s visibility and functionality, striping will help you. Secondly, a well-paved parking lot is the very first thing many customers see, so ensure it gets new asphalt striping every three years. A well-paved restricted parking lot with interesting lines is an easy way to deliver a quick first impression to your customers.

The right asphalt striping will also improve the safety of your parking lot. After all, parking lots are designed to be multi functional. However, you wouldn’t want your asphalt to fall apart on you as you load up your tools or grocery bags. If you use standard paint for your pavement, you can significantly improve its lifespan. A professional epoxy company will provide a quote on the best type of paint to use based upon your specific needs and budget.

Another benefit of the right asphalt striping is its safety. Striping around your parking lots will improve visibility, and more importantly, reduce your risk of an accident or crash. When you have well-paved roads, you are far less likely to have vehicles backing up onto you, especially if there are fire lanes. In fact, statistics show that the majority of accidents happen when someone is backing up from behind in the fire lane! Severe auto accidents can be prevented by properly maintaining your street space.

By increasing the safety and the usability of your space, asphalt striping can add several thousand dollars to your annual curb appeal and utility bills. The majority of owners only consider striping when their asphalt is tired or worn out. If you do not want to spend thousands of dollars on asphalt repairs, then you may want to consider restricting to spruce up your parking lots.

A major benefit of asphalt striping is that it can protect your asphalt parking spaces better than paint. When you apply the paint, you must wait until the paint has dried completely to see full results. This means waiting over a weekend to apply the paint or having it dry overnight. This also means that you must repaint each area repeatedly, which can increase the cost of asphalt striping over time.

Asphalt is one of the easiest to maintain for asphalt striping and stripping. Asphalt maintains its quality and appearance for years with very little upkeep. Unlike other forms of paint, asphalt is resistant to fire codes and other asphalt maintenance practices. It also is highly resistant to alkali and most oil-based paints. You will not need to avoid washing the area after it rains because it will wash off easily. Asphalt is also very durable, so it can stand up to the heaviest traffic coming through an intersection.

There are several other reasons why asphalt is often considered to be the best way to create curb appeal. Asphalt is nonslip, meaning there is no need to use any other types of pavement for parking lots. Since it is so easy to clean, there is no risk of damaging or scratching the asphalt either during or after the painting process. Asphalt is also durable and inexpensive to purchase, which means that it is cost effective in the long run. Paint will often times have to be replaced every few years because they are not as durable as asphalt.

When you choose asphalt pavement markings, you will notice that they come in a variety of different colors and designs. The most common colors are black, red and white, but you can find colored stripes of other colors as well. These different colors make it easy for you to match your new asphalt to the rest of the design that you have in place for your business. Since asphalt stripes can be thin or wide, you may want to buy extra stripes to ensure that your pavement looks as good as possible.

About Washington, Missouri

Named after George Washington after it came under American control, the town was first settled during the rule of the Spanish Empire. It was originally called St. John Meyer's Settlement and was the site of the Spanish log fort San Juan del Misuri (1796–1803).

Family and followers of Daniel Boone settled the area across the river from Washington, Missouri starting in 1799. In 1814 a ferry boat was licensed for crossing the Missouri River to the north, and the settlement became known as Washington Landing. In 1827 a town was laid out, with sale of lots starting in 1829. The cost of land was waived if the buyer could build a substantial house within two years. This encouraged many new settlers.

Substantial numbers of anti-slavery German families started moving to the town in 1833, and they soon overwhelmed the existing population of slaveowners. However, many of the original slaveowners' homes still remain throughout the town. Washington became a strong supporter of the Union during the American Civil War. The town was ransacked by Confederate General Sterling Price's soldiers, but they were unable to keep control of the area.

After the war, Washington became a railroad and steamboat transportation center. Its manufacturing industry, while strong, is not as vibrant as it was decades ago.

The town of Washington has 445 buildings on the National Register of Historic Places. Due to its historic charm, Washington has a growing heritage tourism industry, with visitors also attracted to the nearby Missouri Rhineland.

The Washington Bridge was constructed in 1934 and was the only bridge spanning the Missouri River in Franklin County. It was replaced with a new, wider bridge that was opened to traffic on December 3, 2018. The original bridge was demolished on April 13, 2019.

In 1988, the first Walmart Supercenter opened in Washington.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 9.87 square miles (25.56 km), of which 9.34 square miles (24.19 km) is land and 0.53 square miles (1.37 km) is water. The majority of annual precipitation falls during the humid springs and summers. Typically, fall and winter are relatively dry. While snow is not rare, it is not as frequent as in the upper Midwest. An average of 19 inches falls annually.

The 2020 United States census counted 14,500 people, 5,785 households, and 3,766 families in Washington. The population density was 1,501.0 per square mile (579.5/km). There were 6,203 housing units at an average density of 642.1 per square mile (247.9/km). The racial makeup was 92.21% (13,370) white, 0.61% (89) black or African-American, 0.22% (32) Native American or Alaska Native, 0.79% (114) Asian, 0.12% (18) Pacific Islander, 0.99% (143) from other races, and 5.06% (734) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race was 1.7% (242) of the population.

Of the 5,785 households, 30.9% had children under the age of 18; 50.3% were married couples living together; 24.6% had a female householder with no husband present. Of all households, 29.3% consisted of individuals and 13.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.4 and the average family size was 2.9.

22.7% of the population was under the age of 18, 7.5% from 18 to 24, 24.8% from 25 to 44, 24.7% from 45 to 64, and 17.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38.6 years. For every 100 females, the population had 92.5 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older, there were 93.6 males.

The 2016-2020 5-year American Community Survey estimates show that the median household income was $66,779 (with a margin of error of +/- $6,377) and the median family income was $80,056 (+/- $4,419). Males had a median income of $44,859 (+/- $4,169) versus $33,981 (+/- $2,766) for females. The median income for those above 16 years old was $36,920 (+/- $1,560). Approximately, 5.0% of families and 6.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.0% of those under the age of 18 and 4.5% of those ages 65 or over.

As of the census of 2010, there were 13,982 people, 5,863 households, and 3,665 families living in the city. The population density was 1,497.0 inhabitants per square mile (578.0/km). There were 6,319 housing units at an average density of 676.6 per square mile (261.2/km). The racial makeup of the city was 96.7% White, 0.7% African American, 0.1% Native American, 0.5% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 0.7% from other races, and 1.2% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.1% of the population.

There were 5,863 households, of which 31.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.3% were married couples living together, 10.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.0% had a male householder with no wife present, and 37.5% were non-families. 31.9% of all households were made up of individuals, and 14% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.35 and the average family size was 2.97.

The median age in the city was 39.4 years. 24.1% of residents were under the age of 18; 8.1% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 24.8% were from 25 to 44; 26.1% were from 45 to 64; and 17% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 47.8% male and 52.2% female.

As of the census of 2000, there were 13,243 people, 5,258 households, and 3,501 families living in the city. The population density was 1,548.9 inhabitants per square mile (598.0/km). There were 5,565 housing units at an average density of 650.9 per square mile (251.3/km). The racial makeup of the city was 97.76% White, 0.85% African American, 0.13% Native American, 0.42% Asian, 0.23% from other races, and 0.63% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.66% of the population.

There were 5,258 households, out of which 32.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.7% were married couples living together, 9.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.4% were non-families. 28.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.46 and the average family size was .

In the city, the population was spread out, with 25.7% under the age of 18, 8.7% from 18 to 24, 30.3% from 25 to 44, 19.4% from 45 to 64, and 16.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females, there were 91.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.7 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $43,417, and the median income for a family was $52,433. Males had a median income of $36,163 versus $23,666 for females. The per capita income for the city was $22,360. About 3.0% of families and 5.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.1% of those under age 18 and 4.7% of those age 65 or over.

Related Pages