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About Striping

Although asphalt striping might not look all that important, it needs to be of high consideration for several reasons. First of all, if you’re looking to improve your parking lot’s visibility and functionality, striping will help you. Secondly, a well-paved parking lot is the very first thing many customers see, so ensure it gets new asphalt striping every three years. A well-paved restricted parking lot with interesting lines is an easy way to deliver a quick first impression to your customers.

The right asphalt striping will also improve the safety of your parking lot. After all, parking lots are designed to be multi functional. However, you wouldn’t want your asphalt to fall apart on you as you load up your tools or grocery bags. If you use standard paint for your pavement, you can significantly improve its lifespan. A professional epoxy company will provide a quote on the best type of paint to use based upon your specific needs and budget.

Another benefit of the right asphalt striping is its safety. Striping around your parking lots will improve visibility, and more importantly, reduce your risk of an accident or crash. When you have well-paved roads, you are far less likely to have vehicles backing up onto you, especially if there are fire lanes. In fact, statistics show that the majority of accidents happen when someone is backing up from behind in the fire lane! Severe auto accidents can be prevented by properly maintaining your street space.

By increasing the safety and the usability of your space, asphalt striping can add several thousand dollars to your annual curb appeal and utility bills. The majority of owners only consider striping when their asphalt is tired or worn out. If you do not want to spend thousands of dollars on asphalt repairs, then you may want to consider restricting to spruce up your parking lots.

A major benefit of asphalt striping is that it can protect your asphalt parking spaces better than paint. When you apply the paint, you must wait until the paint has dried completely to see full results. This means waiting over a weekend to apply the paint or having it dry overnight. This also means that you must repaint each area repeatedly, which can increase the cost of asphalt striping over time.

Asphalt is one of the easiest to maintain for asphalt striping and stripping. Asphalt maintains its quality and appearance for years with very little upkeep. Unlike other forms of paint, asphalt is resistant to fire codes and other asphalt maintenance practices. It also is highly resistant to alkali and most oil-based paints. You will not need to avoid washing the area after it rains because it will wash off easily. Asphalt is also very durable, so it can stand up to the heaviest traffic coming through an intersection.

There are several other reasons why asphalt is often considered to be the best way to create curb appeal. Asphalt is nonslip, meaning there is no need to use any other types of pavement for parking lots. Since it is so easy to clean, there is no risk of damaging or scratching the asphalt either during or after the painting process. Asphalt is also durable and inexpensive to purchase, which means that it is cost effective in the long run. Paint will often times have to be replaced every few years because they are not as durable as asphalt.

When you choose asphalt pavement markings, you will notice that they come in a variety of different colors and designs. The most common colors are black, red and white, but you can find colored stripes of other colors as well. These different colors make it easy for you to match your new asphalt to the rest of the design that you have in place for your business. Since asphalt stripes can be thin or wide, you may want to buy extra stripes to ensure that your pavement looks as good as possible.

About Ellisville, Missouri

Ellisville was settled by Captain James Harvey Ferris of Kentucky before 1837. He brought slaves with him when he settled his property south of Manchester and west of Kiefer Creek Road, and it was here the house that became known as the "Ellis House" was constructed. The bricks used for construction of the house were handmade by the slaves; it was also called the "Brick Place" for this reason.

Captain Ferris sold the house to Vespasian Ellis, a newspaper editor in St. Louis. The Old School Democrat, the Native American Bulletin, the Washington Temperance Paper, and The Native American were among Ellis' work. In 1842, Ellis became the United States consul to Venezuela. He ran several ads in the Native American Bulletin in an effort to sell his Ellisville farm. As a result, it was sold to William A. Hereford in 1842 or 1843. Hereford was a Virginian and is credited with the naming of Ellisville after his former post office in Ellisville, Virginia. Hereford opened the first post office here on May 2, 1843. Some believe that the Ellis House itself actually served as the post office for a time. All historical accounts of the area give the same history, but none state clearly whether the town was named for Vespasian Ellis or by William Hereford for his Virginia post office.

Hereford sold to Samuel Wilson, and he sold to Major Clarkson of Kentucky for whom Clarkson Road is named. Major Clarkson sold to Captain Benjamin F. Hutchinson of Kentucky, a steamboat captain and the owner of at least three steamboats. Captain Hutchinson raised fine horses and planted extensive orchards, greatly improving the surrounding countryside. In 1868, Captain Hutchinson subdivided his farm into small lots.

Adam Doering purchased the brick house and a considerable portion of the land. John Henry William Rasch purchased the house about 1896 from the Doerings. The Ellisville House stood until 1969 when it was razed.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 4.39 square miles (11.37 km), all land.

Located 13 miles (21 km) west of the western city limits of St. Louis, Ellisville is located approximately 5 miles (8.0 km) south of Interstate 64, five miles north of Interstate 44 and 7 miles (11 km) west of Interstate 270. There are two primary arterial roads which bisect Ellisville: Missouri Route 100 (Manchester Road) and Missouri Route 340 (Clarkson Road). Ellisville is bordered by the city of Clarkson Valley to the north, the city of Ballwin to the east and southeast, unincorporated St. Louis County to the south, and the city of Wildwood to the west.

The 2020 United States census counted 9,985 people, 3,887 households, and 2,680 families in Ellisville. The population density was 2,284.9 per square mile (882.8/km). There were 4,072 housing units at an average density of 931.8 per square mile (360.0/km). The racial makeup was 82.48% (8,236) white, 2.5% (250) black or African-American, 0.15% (15) Native American, 7.31% (730) Asian, 0.0% (0) Pacific Islander, 1.21% (121) from other races, and 6.34% (633) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race was 6.6% (639) of the population.

Of the 3,887 households, 31.0% had children under the age of 18; 54.4% were married couples living together; 28.0% had a female householder with no husband present. Of all households, 28.8% consisted of individuals and 19.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.5 and the average family size was 3.1.

21.9% of the population was under the age of 18, 6.3% from 18 to 24, 21.6% from 25 to 44, 25.2% from 45 to 64, and 22.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44.4 years. For every 100 females, the population had 83.0 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older, there were 85.3 males.

The 2016-2020 5-year American Community Survey estimates show that the median household income was $78,961 (with a margin of error of +/- $6,910) and the median family income was $104,214 (+/- $15,693). Males had a median income of $53,276 (+/- $2,869) versus $34,523 (+/- $6,429) for females. The median income for those above 16 years old was $45,596 (+/- $5,363). Approximately, 1.4% of families and 2.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.1% of those under the age of 18 and 3.1% of those ages 65 or over.

As of the census of 2010, there were 9,169 people, 3,669 households, and 2,469 families living in the city. The population density was 2,080.4 inhabitants per square mile (803.2/km). There were 3,802 housing units at an average density of 866.1 per square mile (334.4/km). The racial makeup of the city was 91.7% White, 1.9% African American, 0.1% Native American, 4.3% Asian, 0.6% from other races, and 1.4% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.4% of the population.

There were 3,621 households, of which 31.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.6% were married couples living together, 8.3% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.1% had a male householder with no wife present, and 31.0% were non-families. 27.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 16.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.47 and the average family size was 3.04.

The median age in the city was 44.7 years. 23.7% of residents were under the age of 18; 5.7% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 21% were from 25 to 44; 29.7% were from 45 to 64; and 19.8% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 46.7% male and 53.3% female.

As of the census of 2000, there were 9,104 people, 3,209 households, and 2,486 families living in the city. The population density was 2,094.1 inhabitants per square mile (808.5/km). There were 3,292 housing units at an average density of 757.2 per square mile (292.4/km). The racial makeup of the city was 95.11% White, 1.58% African American, 0.11% Native American, 2.05% Asian, 0.38% from other races, and 0.76% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.16% of the population.

There were 3,209 households, out of which 39.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 66.9% were married couples living together, 8.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.5% were non-families. 19.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.74 and the average family size was 3.16.

In the city the population was spread out, with 27.2% under the age of 18, 5.7% from 18 to 24, 28.7% from 25 to 44, 23.8% from 45 to 64, and 14.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females, there were 91.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.8 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $65,016, and the median income for a family was $74,375. Males had a median income of $55,224 versus $32,062 for females. The per capita income for the city was $27,379. About 1.9% of families and 3.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.3% of those under age 18 and 5.4% of those age 65 or over.

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